FAQ: GOAL LINE TECHNOLOGY

16 Apr
Image Courtesy of Richard Fisher

Image Courtesy of Richard Fisher

 

WHAT IS GOAL LINE TECHNOLOGY?

Goal line Technology (GLT) is an electronic method to determine when the ball has completely crossed the goal line. The objective of this system is not to replace the referee or the official’s role in a match but to assist and aid them in their decision-making.

WHO IS IT GOING TO USE IT?

FA Board (IFAB) has approved two Goal-line Technology systems to be used in the coming 2013-2014 Premier League Season. After passing a series of scientific tests in December of 2012, FIFA announced the introduction Hawk-Eye and GoalRef at the 2012 FIFA Club World Cup in Japan, the same systems that Premier League will be using next year.

HOW DOES HAWK-EYE SYSTEM WORK?

Hawk-Eyes functioning relies on the different angles’ combination of seven cameras focused on the goals. There is not a specific spot for the cameras’ location; however the most common spot is the roof of the stadium. The images filmed from each of the cameras are processed to identify what the ball is and what the ball is not, at the same time that they track the ball.
When the ball comes into their range, the cameras are able to identify the exact timing when the ball crosses the goal-line, and within a second, the outcome is sent to the match referee’s watch.
The Hawk-Eye system has been used before in other sports such as tennis or cricket.

HOW DOES GOALREF SYSTEM WORK?

GoalRef system creates the radio equivalent of a light curtain. It works by detecting the passage of the ball using magnetic induction. Low magnetic fields are produced around the goal, and when the ball crosses the line, a slight but detectable change on the magnetic field is detected, allowing to accurately position the ball. The outcome is transmitted to the officials through radio signal.

HOW ACCURATE ARE GLT SYSTEMS?

The systems are millimetre accurate, ensuring that no broadcast replays could disapprove the decision made. Besides, both systems are precisely built not to be affected by any possible interference.

WILL VIEWERS BE ABLE TO SEE THE IMAGES OF HAWK-EYE?

Yes. The video replay will be available for viewers 10 seconds after the recording. The Hawk-Eye is able to remove the players from the image to ensure that the ball is fully visible.

WHEN DID THEY DECIDE TO CREATE GLT?

The question to introduce goal-line technology began to be raised in 2000 after Victor Ikpeba’s penalty for Nigeria against Cameroon was deemed by the referee not to have crossed the line after deflecting off the crossbar. Nevertheless, the televisions showed it had. The match concluded with the fair or maybe unfair victory of Cameroon with the Trophy of African Unity.
In addition, calls to introduce GLT have grown louder after the recent seasons. The non-awarding goal of Frank Lampard’s shot in the match between England and Germany at the 2012 FIFA World Cup in Bloemdontein triggered the IFAB to reconsider the use of GLT to provide an accurate and exact outcome.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF GLT?

The results of GLT are more accurate than any human observation since the systems are not affected by weather factors such as rain, fug or snow. Besides, if the decisions are decided in an objective manner, there will be fewer disputes.

On the other hand, the GLT might slow the game down, even though the inventor of the system, Paul Hawkins, assures that the GLT will not transform football into rugby, since it is a really fast and efficient system.

HOW DO FOOTBALLERS AND FOOTBALL SUPPORTERS FEEL ABOUT GLT?

According to CNN, football players are keen to internationalize this technology. Tijs Tummers, secretary of FIFpro’s technical committee, assured that players were tired of incorrect decisions over goals. In a poll by international player’s union FIFpro, 90% of respondents said they wanted to see goal line technology introduced.

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